Viewing entries tagged
Gallipoli

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ANZAC Day Origins: Canon DJ Garland and Trans-Tasman Commemoration

By: John A Moses and George F Davis

PUBLISHED: AUSTRALIA: BARTON BOOKS, 2013

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The disastrous loss of human life on Turkey’s Gallipoli Peninsula between April and December 1915 prompted a wave of shock and grief in Australia and New Zealand. When the ANZAC casualty lists were published and digested, two questions were most pressing. How could so much personal grief be managed? What might the two nations do to commemorate their war dead? Throughout both Dominions politicians, leading citizens and churchmen were advancing schemes to help both nations move forward. Above the cacophony of discordant voices, an Anglican priest from Brisbane – Canon David John Garland (1864–1939) – attracted the attention of those seeking to redeem the loss of so many souls from the spectre of terrible waste. His previous experience as a secretary-organiser of the Bible-in-Schools League on both sides of the Tasman had made him a household name in Australia and New Zealand. By the end of his life, Canon Garland became known as the “architect” of Anzac Day and was widely esteemed for promoting a vision of commemoration that spanned the trans-Tasman experience of war, that honoured the war dead and brought comfort to those who mourned. Anzac Day Origins addresses the often vaguely understood beginnings of Anzac Day in Australia and New Zealand, and adds significantly to the self-understanding of both nations.

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Condolence Letters

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Condolence Letters

"We were resting for a few minutes on what is known as Rhododendron Ridge when the Turks began to shell us and a piece of shrapnel struck your son on the head, it knocked him unconscious. ... I can assure you he never knew what hit him...."

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ANZAC Battlefield: A Gallipoli Landscape of War and Memory

EDITED BY: ANTONIO SAGONA, MITHAT ATABAY, C.J. MACKIE, IAN McGIBBON, AND RICHARD REID.

PUBLISHED BY: CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS, 2016.

Anzac Battlefield: A Gallipoli Landscape of War and Memory explores the transformation of Gallipoli's landscape in antiquity, during the famed battles of the First World War and in the present day. Drawing on archival, archaeological and cartographic material, this book unearths the deep history of the Gallipoli peninsula, setting the Gallipoli campaign in a broader cultural and historical context. The book presents the results of an original archaeological survey, the research for which was supported by the Australian, New Zealand and Turkish Governments. The survey examines materials from both sides of the battlefield, and sheds new light on the environment in which Anzac and Turkish soldiers endured the conflict. Richly illustrated with both Ottoman and Anzac archival images and maps, as well as original maps and photographs of the landscape and archaeological findings, Anzac Battlefield is an important contribution to our understanding of Gallipoli and its landscape of war and memory.


Available to borrow from Palmerston North City Libraries

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Heroes of Gallipoli : the Gallantry of New Zealanders on Gallipoli

BY RICHARD STOWERS

PUBLISHER: JOHN DOUGLAS PUBLISHING

“With the centenary of the First World War upon us in 2015, Richard Stowers has written this book to increase the awareness of the unpretentious gallantry and service by New Zealanders during the Gallipoli campaign.

“The book details the bravery and distinguished service of men and women of the 1st echelon of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force during the Gallipoli campaign.

"In some ways those listed in the book were the lucky ones whose courage was officially recognised. Many more who did heroic acts were not so fortunate, and their actions were never officially recognised due to the fortunes of war.

"Often overshadowed by the exploits of the Australians who were awarded nine Victoria Crosses during the Gallipoli campaign, time and time again the New Zealanders were denied gallantry medals by their high command.

"New Zealand can be rightly proud of these men and women who did extraordinary deeds during times of danger, hardship and peril.” (From book jacket: written by Hugh Keane, Military historian)

Available to borrow from Palmerston North City Libraries

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Gallipoli (Great Battles series)

BY JENNY MACLEOD

PUBLISHER: OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS

The British-led Mediterranean Expeditionary Force that attacked the Ottoman Empire at Gallipoli in 1915 was a multi-national affair, including Australian, New Zealand, Irish, French, and Indian soldiers. Ultimately a failure, the campaign ended with the withdrawal of the Allied forces after less than nine months and the unexpected victory of the Ottoman armies and their German allies.

In Britain, the campaign led to the removal of Churchill from his post as First Lord of the Admiralty and the abandonment of the plan to attack Germany via its 'soft underbelly' in the East. Thereafter, it was largely forgotten on a national level, commemorated only in specific localities linked to the campaign. In post-war Turkey, by contrast, the memory of Gallipoli played an important role in the formation of a Turkish national identity, celebrating both the ordinary soldier and the genius of the republic's first president, Mustafa Kemal. The campaign served a similarly important formative role in both Australia and New Zealand, where it is commemorated annually on Anzac Day. For the southern Irish, meanwhile, the bitter memory of service for the King in a botched campaign was forgotten for decades.

Shaped initially by the imperatives of war-time, and the needs of the grief-stricken and the bereft, the memory of Gallipoli has been re-made time and again over the last century. For the Turks an inspirational victory, for many on the Allied side a glorious and romantic defeat, for others still an episode best forgotten, 'Gallipoli' has meant different things to different people, serving by turns as an occasion of sincere and heartfelt sorrow, an opportunity for separatist and feminist protest, and a formative influence in the forging of national identities. (from book cover)


Available to borrow from Palmerston North City Libraries

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The Battle for Lone Pine: Four Days of Hell at the Heart of Gallipoli

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The Battle for Lone Pine: Four Days of Hell at the Heart of Gallipoli

"The Battle for Lone Pine is the first book devoted to this cornerstone of the Anzac legend, drawing on unforgettable first-hand accounts scratched into diaries and letters home. The stories of the diggers, as well as the engineers, nurses, sappers, commanders and more, provide an invaluable record of the battle and serve as moving testimony to their courage in appalling conditions." Available to borrow from Palmerston North City Libraries.

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Man of Iron: The Extraordinary Story of New Zealand WW1 Hero Lieutenant-Colonel William Malone

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Man of Iron: The Extraordinary Story of New Zealand WW1 Hero Lieutenant-Colonel William Malone

BY JOCK VENNELL

PUBLISHER: ALLEN & UNWIN

Lieutenant-Colonel William Malone is one of New Zealand's best-known First World War soldiers, having held off fierce Turkish counter-attacks for nearly two days before being killed by a shell from a British warship. The defence of Chunuk Bair has been described as one of New Zealand's finest hours. Malone and his men captured and held the heights of Chunuk Bair on the Gallipoli Peninsula in August 1915.

William Malone was not only an outstanding military leader, as commander of the Wellington Infantry Battalion, but also a successful farmer, lawyer and family man. His letters reveal a man unfulfilled by peacetime pursuits, and war offered him a liberation of spirit and a new sense of purpose. Leaving for the front, he wrote, 'I leave a lucrative practice, a happy home, a brave wife and children without any hesitation. I feel I am just beginning to live.'

This is the first biography of William Malone.  (Description from back of book)

Available to borrow at Palmerston North City Libraries


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Just Added - Why ANZAC with Sam Neill

Documentary presented by Sam Neill  

(DVD -  86 minutes)

PUBLISHER: Australian Broadcasting Corporation.  

Sam Neill confronts the Anzac century through the lens of his family’s military tradition. He uncovers forgotten truths that reveal the power of the enduring myth of Anzac that still haunt our two countries’ histories. Filmed in a score of international locations and against a background of continuing turmoil, Sam’s sharing of poignant, intimate stories suggests the universality of our need to remember in ways that may offer redemption.


Available to borrow from Palmerston North City Library

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Just Added - Remembering Gallipoli: Interviews with New Zealand Gallipoli Veterans

BY CHRISTOPHER PUGSLEY AND CHARLES FERRALL

PUBLISHER: VICTORIA UNIVERSITY PRESS

 

Remembering Gallipoli tells the story of Gallipoli in the words of the soldiers who fought there, taken from interviews towards the end of their lives. Immediate, vivid and engrossing, it is an important record of a pivotal moment in New Zealand’s history.

 

‘I was so young and I couldn’t join up quick enough.’

Private Walter (‘Wattie’) Pukuae Barclay, NZ&A Divisional Headquarters

 

‘Everybody told us that it’d only last six months. We thought we’d just about get to the other side of the world and the war would be over.’

Trooper James Simpkins, Auckland Mounted Rifles

 

 ‘I came back. All the others died over there. They were all killed, and I don’t know why I wasn’t.’

Trooper John (‘Polly’) Edward Parrant, Wellington Mounted Rifles

 

(From Back cover of book)

 

 Available to borrow from Palmerston North City Library

 

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Just Added - When ANZAC Day Comes Around : 100 Years From Gallipoli Poetry Project

BY GRAEME LINDSAY

PUBLISHER: FORTY SOUTH PUBLISHING

When Anzac Day comes around presents answers to two questions that Graeme Lindsay posed to Australian and New Zealand poets as part of his 100 Years from Gallipoli Poetry Project: -

What does Anzac Day mean to you, to today's families, communities or nations?

What about Remembrance Day or other military commemorations or anniversaries?

The views of more than 200 Australian and New Zealand poets - some well-known in the literary world and others whose poetry is known only to family and friends - stimulate and challenge the reader to con-sider differing ideas about each nations' commemoration of military conflicts and the emotions these evoke.

Current perspectives are contrasted with those from earlier times as we are taken on a poetic journey from the 1840s (when troops from colonial New South Wales were sent to New Zealand to fight against the Maori) to the conflicts of the 21st century.

Lindsay complements the poetry with more than 120 photographs of war memorials from across Australia and New Zealand - images that encourage us to reflect upon the true purpose of these symbols of remembrance and their place in today's society.

 

And ever, in the brighter years,

When war has passed away,

Remember we our valiant ones

Who gave us Anzac Day.

 

- Excerpt from “The Day We Celebrate: That Glorious Landing” by C.S.L. (1919)

 

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Just Added - The Landing at ANZAC 1915

BY CHRIS ROBERTS

PUBLISHER: ARMY HISTORY UNIT

‘The Landing at Anzac, 1915’ challenges many of the cherished myths of the most celebrated battle in Australian and New Zealand history — myths that have endured for almost a century. Told from both the Anzac and Turkish perspectives, this meticulously researched account questions several of the claims of Charles Bean’s magisterial and much-quoted Australian official history and presents a fresh examination of the evidence from a range of participants.

Author Chris Roberts takes a forensic look at this iconic battle, providing a tactical analysis of the terrain, scrutiny of the misplaced landing and the two fateful decisions that determined the initial course of the battle, and examines the performance of both Anzac and Turkish commanders and troops. Long considered a ragtag army, the Ottoman forces proved tough, well-trained opponents who outclassed an inadequately trained, inexperienced and poorly prepared Australian and New Zealand Army Corps.


Available to borrow from Palmerston North City Library

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Just Added - Gallipoli: A Ridge Too Far

EDITED BY ASHLEY EKINS

PUBLISHER: EXISLE PUBLISHING

 

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‘Gallipoli: a Ridge too far’ features a unique and extensive range of Australian War Memorial photographs and describes the pivotal events of that momentous year as they affected all the countries involved. The book combines fresh perspectives from the world’s leading authorities, including Turkish and German historians, together with soldiers’ letters and diary accounts.


Available to borrow from Palmerston North City Library

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Just Added - The Gallipoli Songbook: 21 Iconic Songs Arranged for Piano, Voice and Guitar

PUBLISHER: WISE PUBLICATIONS

Songs include:

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Advance Australia Fair -- Along the road to Gundagai -- And the band played Waltzing Matilda -- For me and my gal -- The gift of years -- God save the King -- Hello! Hello! Who's your lady friend? -- Here we are, here we are, here we are again -- I wonder who's kissing her now -- If you were the only girl (in the world) -- It's a long way to Tipperary -- Keep the home fires burning -- No man’s land / The green fields of France -- Oh! It’s a lovely war -- Over there -- Pack up your troubles (in your old kit bag) -- Roses of Picardy -- Take me back to dear old Blighty -- There's a long, long trail -- They didn't believe me -- Waltzing Matilda


Available to borrow from Palmerston North City Library

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Just Added - Fatal Charge at Gallipoli

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Just Added - Fatal Charge at Gallipoli

Using the letters and diaries of those who fought and died in this famously futile action, award-winning journalist and best-selling author, John Hamilton takes the reader on a journey from the rush to recruit in August 1914 when war was declared, through the training camps to the unforgiving terrain of Gallipoli and the unbending Turkish defenders, and finally to that fateful morning and that fatal charge.

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