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Edwin Mainman's Bronze Plaque

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Edwin Mainman's Bronze Plaque

This memorial plaque is popularly known as a "dead man's penny", issued post World War I to the next-of-kin of all British and Empire military killed while serving in the war.

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With Dr Martin at the Front

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With Dr Martin at the Front

Accounts from local surgeon Arthur Anderson Martin, including "Poor German Marksmanship", "The State of the Trenches", "Dreaded Gangrene" and "Hints to New Zealanders"

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Arthur Gannon's Peace Carriers - celebrating the end of the war

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Arthur Gannon's Peace Carriers - celebrating the end of the war

Arthur Gannon’s Peace Carriers wore one of the features of the recent Wellington Peace Celebrations procession. They made a fine display, comprising nine vehicles drawn by-twenty horses, all elaborately decorated, and from one of the lorries the above typical bulldog, robed in a Union Jack gazed intently down on the crowds. In addition to the above display Arthur Gannon who is a returned lieutenant of the Maori Pioneers N.Z.E.F., placed a number of Lorries and expresses at the free disposal of the Salvation Army, etc

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'Reminiscences' from Palmerston North Mayor James Nash

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'Reminiscences' from Palmerston North Mayor James Nash

James Alfred Nash (b. 1871) was Mayor of Palmerston North from 1908-1923 and three time MP for the city. He put together this collection of his memories around 1951, one year before his death. The Ian Matheson City Archives holds a complete copy of this work - this section talks about subjects relevant during the war years - the Patriotic Society, War Activities and the Influenza Epidemic.

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Position Slip

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Position Slip

Message slips such as this one were used on all sides to communicate vital information through dangerous territory. They were carried by human runners as well as animals - including dogs and pigeons.

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Grave of Sapper Robert Arthur Hislop

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Grave of Sapper Robert Arthur Hislop

Robert Arthur Hislop is considered to be the first New Zealand casualty of World War I. At the age of 21, he died from critical injuries occurring from a fall off the Parnell rail bridge on the evening of the 13th of August, 1914. This was eight days after New Zealand supported Britain and declared war against the German Empire.  Six days later, he sadly passed away (Stone, 2014).

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Standing orders 1914-1918

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Standing orders 1914-1918

This booklet belonged to Charles Peter Hamilton Neilson, a farmer of Awahou North who fought in World War One. The donors purchased the Neilson farm and found this and other articles in the house.  Charles (born 1886, died 1929) enlisted in the New Zealand army in February 1917.

In July 1917 he embarked as part of the 28th Reinforcements for France with the Wellington Infantry Regiment, B Company, rank: private. He served in France from November 1917 with 3 1/2 months sick leave (late Dec 1917 - Feb 1918, Aug - early Sept 1918), returning to New Zealand in August 1919.

Military standing orders are a directive from the military commander, binding on all personnel under their command. They include standard operating procedures for military personnel. This booklet has instructions for the mounting and relieving of guards, sentry duties, dress regulations, the layout for one's kit, and the daily timetable to be followed for billets and camps.

Booklet of Standing Orders for the Wellington Regiment during World War One, 1914 - 1918. Small 28 page booklet with yellow card hardcovers. Published by the NZ Div. PressContents include:

  • guard mounting
  • guard marching on to Regimental Parade Ground
  • relieving a guard
  • reliefs - posting sentries, relieving sentries
  • orders for N.C.O. of the guard
  • standing orders for quarter guard
  • orders for all sentries
  • special orders for N.C.O. in charge of the guard: prisoners
  • march discipline
  • dress regulations - drill order, musketry order, full marching order, heavy marching order, fighting order, working party order, walking out dress, clean fatigue dress, church parade order, general
  • laying out of kits in billets and camps
  • routine to be observed in billets and camps unless Special Orders to the Contrary are issued drill
     

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Brass "Service Wounded" Stripe

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Brass "Service Wounded" Stripe

Wounded stripes were an innovation of 1916 and followed a suggestion made by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle that wounding should be recognised by some distinction. To receive the stripe, each soldier needed to have been listed in the casualty returns as 'wounded'

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Commemorative Scarves - "Fall In" and "It's a Long Way to Tipperary"

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Commemorative Scarves - "Fall In" and "It's a Long Way to Tipperary"

Cambridge Museum, N.Z. notes that items like these are "characteristic of the souvenirs made and sold cheaply, and easily transportable either by mail or in the post, during World War One. Such mementos were sold at both locations of the war effort: close to war zones where soldiers could buy them; and at home, appealing to families who might retain them as a keepsake of a loved one or post them overseas."

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From the Archives - "In the Firing Line", William Dawbin's Gallipoli Diary

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From the Archives - "In the Firing Line", William Dawbin's Gallipoli Diary

William Dawbin (of Awahuri) was posted to the Wellington Mounted Rifles and shipped out 15 October 1914, first traveling to Egypt and later to the Dardanelles. He was wounded on May 27th at Gaba Tepe (modern Kapatepe, where the Anzac troops landed at Gallipoli). His military record states that he suffered paralysis of the spine. Read his account of his time in Gallipoli here. 

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From the Archives - The Diary of Polly Boroughs

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From the Archives - The Diary of Polly Boroughs

This diary describes the final journey of a trooper named William Dawbin, from Awahuri, who had his spine severed at Gaba Tepe (Anzac Cove). It comes not from William himself, but from his cousin Polly, who visited him nearly every day in Netley Hospital in Southampton. To read more about William, see his own Gallipoli Diary and In Memoriam, written by his family to provide context to Polly's diary. Te Manawa Museum kindly lent all of these resources to the Ian Matheson City Archives for the Window Into WW1 project.

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