Viewing entries tagged
ANZAC

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Victory at Villers-Bretonneux: Why a French Town Will Never Forget the ANZACS

By Peter Fitzsimons

PUBLISHED BY: PENGUIN AUSTRALIA, 2016

Victory at Villers.jpg

Arriving at Villers-Bretonneux just in time, the Australians are able to hold off the Germans, launching a vicious counterattack that hurls the Germans back for the first time.

And then, on Anzac Day 1918, when the town falls after all to the British defenders, it is again the Australians who are called on to save the day, the town, and the entire battle.

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DVD: The ANZACs War Horses: The 100 Years, 100 Horses ANZAC Ride

South Coast Productions, New Zealand

DVD duration: approx. 80 minutes.

Whilst this DVD captures the story of the commemorative 100 years, 100 horses ANZAC ride from Amuri to Waikari, New Zealand it also shows the horrors that were inflicted on the courageous horses.  From the disaster of Gallipoli to the inspiring Palestine Campaign and to the horrors of the Western Front, it graphically shows what our young men endured in World War One.  (From DVD cover).


Available to borrow from Palmerston North City Libraries

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ANZAC Battlefield: A Gallipoli Landscape of War and Memory

EDITED BY: ANTONIO SAGONA, MITHAT ATABAY, C.J. MACKIE, IAN McGIBBON, AND RICHARD REID.

PUBLISHED BY: CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS, 2016.

Anzac Battlefield: A Gallipoli Landscape of War and Memory explores the transformation of Gallipoli's landscape in antiquity, during the famed battles of the First World War and in the present day. Drawing on archival, archaeological and cartographic material, this book unearths the deep history of the Gallipoli peninsula, setting the Gallipoli campaign in a broader cultural and historical context. The book presents the results of an original archaeological survey, the research for which was supported by the Australian, New Zealand and Turkish Governments. The survey examines materials from both sides of the battlefield, and sheds new light on the environment in which Anzac and Turkish soldiers endured the conflict. Richly illustrated with both Ottoman and Anzac archival images and maps, as well as original maps and photographs of the landscape and archaeological findings, Anzac Battlefield is an important contribution to our understanding of Gallipoli and its landscape of war and memory.


Available to borrow from Palmerston North City Libraries

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The Battle for Lone Pine: Four Days of Hell at the Heart of Gallipoli

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The Battle for Lone Pine: Four Days of Hell at the Heart of Gallipoli

"The Battle for Lone Pine is the first book devoted to this cornerstone of the Anzac legend, drawing on unforgettable first-hand accounts scratched into diaries and letters home. The stories of the diggers, as well as the engineers, nurses, sappers, commanders and more, provide an invaluable record of the battle and serve as moving testimony to their courage in appalling conditions." Available to borrow from Palmerston North City Libraries.

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Just Added - Why ANZAC with Sam Neill

Documentary presented by Sam Neill  

(DVD -  86 minutes)

PUBLISHER: Australian Broadcasting Corporation.  

Sam Neill confronts the Anzac century through the lens of his family’s military tradition. He uncovers forgotten truths that reveal the power of the enduring myth of Anzac that still haunt our two countries’ histories. Filmed in a score of international locations and against a background of continuing turmoil, Sam’s sharing of poignant, intimate stories suggests the universality of our need to remember in ways that may offer redemption.


Available to borrow from Palmerston North City Library

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Just Added - The Landing at ANZAC 1915

BY CHRIS ROBERTS

PUBLISHER: ARMY HISTORY UNIT

‘The Landing at Anzac, 1915’ challenges many of the cherished myths of the most celebrated battle in Australian and New Zealand history — myths that have endured for almost a century. Told from both the Anzac and Turkish perspectives, this meticulously researched account questions several of the claims of Charles Bean’s magisterial and much-quoted Australian official history and presents a fresh examination of the evidence from a range of participants.

Author Chris Roberts takes a forensic look at this iconic battle, providing a tactical analysis of the terrain, scrutiny of the misplaced landing and the two fateful decisions that determined the initial course of the battle, and examines the performance of both Anzac and Turkish commanders and troops. Long considered a ragtag army, the Ottoman forces proved tough, well-trained opponents who outclassed an inadequately trained, inexperienced and poorly prepared Australian and New Zealand Army Corps.


Available to borrow from Palmerston North City Library

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