Viewing entries in
RNZ Engineer Corps

Arthur Gannon's Peace Carriers - celebrating the end of the war

Comment

Arthur Gannon's Peace Carriers - celebrating the end of the war

Arthur Gannon’s Peace Carriers wore one of the features of the recent Wellington Peace Celebrations procession. They made a fine display, comprising nine vehicles drawn by-twenty horses, all elaborately decorated, and from one of the lorries the above typical bulldog, robed in a Union Jack gazed intently down on the crowds. In addition to the above display Arthur Gannon who is a returned lieutenant of the Maori Pioneers N.Z.E.F., placed a number of Lorries and expresses at the free disposal of the Salvation Army, etc

Comment

Position Slip

Comment

Position Slip

Message slips such as this one were used on all sides to communicate vital information through dangerous territory. They were carried by human runners as well as animals - including dogs and pigeons.

Comment

Grave of Sapper Robert Arthur Hislop

1 Comment

Grave of Sapper Robert Arthur Hislop

Robert Arthur Hislop is considered to be the first New Zealand casualty of World War I. At the age of 21, he died from critical injuries occurring from a fall off the Parnell rail bridge on the evening of the 13th of August, 1914. This was eight days after New Zealand supported Britain and declared war against the German Empire.  Six days later, he sadly passed away (Stone, 2014).

1 Comment

Arthur 'Wata' Gannon - Letter 2 from Sling Camp

Comment

Arthur 'Wata' Gannon - Letter 2 from Sling Camp

"Darling I do miss you both. How grand it will be when all this is over, but sweetheart the end is not in sight yet: You say, "you hope I will remain in Sling for some time" up to the present your wish is gratified - I am still on the Staff - I have a good position. When I receive orders to go "over-seas" I will cable you - so don't be anxious about me."

Comment

A Brother's Letter Home

Comment

A Brother's Letter Home

"I am sorry to hear you have been having a crook spin with the children and poor old Una nearly passed her ticker.  Well Old thing, you will soon have the old man home now both in fact but Wata will race me home I think. What a time will all have."

Comment

D. V. Mason's "Blue Ticket"

Comment

D. V. Mason's "Blue Ticket"

A "blue ticket" indicated that a soldier had undergone and passed a medical check for venereal disease. General Alexander Godley wrote to Defense Minister James Allen in 1915, that "[r]eally the only trouble I foresee is venereal, I [am] afraid we are bound to lose almost 10% of the men through it. The women here are full of it...." 

Comment