"Fall In"

"Fall In"

These three commemorative scarves showcase some of the patriotic songs and symbols from the First World War. The centre in the first scarf has the picture of a service man in cap blowing a bugle, and around the edges are pictures of the flags of Belgium, Japan, Great Britain, France and Russia.  Just in from each corner are four verses of the song "FALL IN". The song asks men, what will be their excuse in the years to come for not enlisting in the war.  

The song 'Fall In' printed on the scarf, together with the flags of different countries suggests this scarf was produced as a patriotic item, most likely for World War I. The song / poem 'Fall in' was published in Britain about September 1914. It questions what a man might say when asked 'what he did for the war', and is cited as an example of the peer pressure put on men to enlist.  Cambridge Museum, N.Z. notes: Items like this handkerchief are characteristic of the souvenirs made and sold cheaply, and easily transportable either by mail or in the post, during World War One. Such mementos were sold at both locations of the war effort: close to war zones where soldiers could buy them; and at home, appealing to families who might retain them as a keepsake of a loved one or post them overseas.'

"It's a Long Way to Tipperary"

The second scarf has the words and music for the song "ITS A LONG, LONG WAY TO TIPPERARY" with a company of soldiers marching below.  Around the edges are various countries' flags with a medal in each corner. The song was first performed in a British music hall in January 1912, and became popular among soldiers in World War I.   

"A Souvenir of the Great World War and the Glorious Part played by Australia and New Zealand"

A third object is a cotton banner, printed with scenes of the Allies at Gallipoli, in World War One.  Titled: 'A Souvenir of the Great World War and the Glorious Part played by Australia and New Zealand'. 

Cambridge Museum, N.Z. notes that items like these are "characteristic of the souvenirs made and sold cheaply, and easily transportable either by mail or in the post, during World War One. Such mementos were sold at both locations of the war effort: close to war zones where soldiers could buy them; and at home, appealing to families who might retain them as a keepsake of a loved one or post them overseas."  

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