Corporal Joseph Glen Kennerley

Corporal Joseph Glen Kennerley

Keith Bellhouse's grandfather, Corp. Joseph Glen Kennerley, went away to war on April 17, 1915.  He wrote a diary during his time in World War One. This small diary, subsequently published by his family, was written in pencil and the script was challenging to decipher. A copy of the diary in book form has been passed to the Ian Matheson City Archives (available for viewing upon request). He was wounded on August 18 1915, an event he describes in his diary:

"The bullets has been whistling past our ears and thudding into the ground all the time but one thudded into me instead. Over I went. flat on my face, to get up immediately and start swearing at the man behind. It flashed through my mind that I had been hit from behind with an entrenching tool on my right shoulder. Then it dawned on me that I was out of the fight, I had landed one. I could not feel any sensation but could feel the blood trickling down my back. So when those nearest me asked what the matter was I said I had got a crack but only a light one. Lieut. Steve McGorie came up to see what was up. I told him, but I said I thought I could carry on. He ordered me back to the dressing station to get an anti-tetanus injection at least, as the danger of infection was great, especially in our weakened condition. So I scrambled back along the outside of the Sap to the dressing station, arriving there at 3.20 am. One of the medical corp. examined it and put a field dressing on the hole. It was certainly a lucky one, for it had gone through my haversack and through the shoulder strap of my webb equipment and into the shoulder blade. Luckily the bone was tough and didn't split. The bullet had embedded in it and I could feel the end sticking out into the muscle so that I could not move my arm. It was just as though it was nailed to the bone. The haversack had slowed the bullet down so that it did not go right through and into the lung, but it was too painful to try to use the arm for anything. Anyway there was no A.T.S. [anti-tetanus] so they insisted that we all go over to the hospital ships."

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